21/11/2018

The availability of both ‘skilled’ and ‘non-skilled’ labour workers within the UK is limited, and with the industry relying heavily on EU migrant workers to meet current demands, the curbs on a migration deal threaten the future of the construction industry.

Lack of a Workforce

The availability of both ‘skilled’ and ‘non-skilled’ labour workers within the UK is limited, and with the industry relying heavily on EU migrant workers to meet current demands the curbs on a migration deal threaten the future of the construction industry.

The UK will face higher project costs, hindering the government’s initiative to increase housing across the country.

With Brexit threatening to leave a shortage of labour workers, the UK will face higher project costs, hindering the government’s initiative to increase housing across the UK and potentially worsen the housing crisis that we currently face.

The Prime Minister has announced that EU citizens will no longer be given priority to live and work in Britain unless they are highly skilled, which has left employers seeing a decline in candidates from the EU applying for roles within the UK.

Changes to Regulations & Standards

The majority of the UK’s Health & Safety regulations have originated from the EU, and with the country preparing to leave, it poses many unanswered questions on the impact it will have on construction workers across the UK. However, as Health & Safety is so enshrined into UK law, and with the UK boasting one of the lowest rates of fatal injuries across the EU, it's highly unlikely that we'll see regulations being relaxed or substantially changed.

With the uncertainty over the terms of our exit from the EU, it seems improbable that the government will alter current legislative frameworks, as by doing so could hinder businesses ability to trade with EU member states. However, we may see impactions to other trade agreements that the UK currently has or agreements we intend to enter into across the world. 

 Inflation to Construction Materials

As well as the potential critical shortage in labour workers, it has been estimated that over £10 billion of construction products are currently being imported from the EU every year. Since the UK chose to leave the EU the price of materials has been continuously increasing.

"Since the UK chose to leave the EU, the price of materials has been continuously increasing."

With the fall of the sterling and the lack of deal being struck, if the UK is unable to make similar arrangements for a free movement of goods, inflation on materials will soar and time pressures on projects will increase, hitting the construction industry hard.